PLEASE submit case histories

by admin on May 6, 2010

What’s most needed for the project right now are case history submissions.  Please either print off the case history for mailing with any support documents or records you are willing to send, or you can now submit your case history on the site.  I understand well how time consuming it can be to assemble a complete history, particularly for the dogs whose stories stretch over some period of time.  At this point I would rather have some/the basic information than have nothing so that we can get some better sense of the numbers, so PLEASE submit your information and encourage anyone you know with an affected dog to do the same.

Looks to the right of this post, and you should see the links to the case history forms.  Thanks so much in advance for your help!

{ 3 comments… read them below or add one }

laura picard December 28, 2010 at 9:05 am

my 5 year-old gsp male woke one morning with a collapsed
lung and fluid in his heart cavity. after clearing that up, a bulla
developed and surgery was performed to remove a foxtail seed which
punctured his lung and left a scar tissue. we were hunting in Iowa
where he inhaled the foxtail. he is now 12 and still hunts with
gusto.

admin September 3, 2011 at 9:56 am

Thanks for stopping by and sharing Mojo’s story. I’m glad that he came through his infection without lasting affects on his health. Please continue to share the information about grass awn-related illness. Educated owners = safer dogs!

The Heberts April 24, 2012 at 5:57 pm

Our lab, Zeus, was diagnosed today with an infection from grass awns.

We took him to the Louisiana State University Vet School yesterday and they diagnosed him.

They believe he inhaled the grass awns because his chest cavity is the only area that is affected. He stopped eating a few days ago and was breathing heavily which is why we brought him in. His chest cavity was filled with fluids. The doctors are still draining fluid from his chest cavity and we wont know until tomorrow if he’ll need surgery (70% chance of survival) or just a heavy does of antibiotics and a saline cleanse. Its going to depend on the number of abscesses and their severity.

We’re crossing our finger for the little guy (only 18 months old) but we’re confident he’ll pull through and be back to playing fetch in no time.

We are confused though. we live in south Louisiana and everything I’ve read says there is no foxtail barley in this area. He did spend 2 in Michigan last summer with his trainer. Is it possible he inhaled the awns that long ago?

We’ll keep you updated on his progress.

Leave a Comment

Previous post:

Next post: